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Archive for April, 2010

Tamegonit Lodge’s pie-shaped issues (P1 and P2) are intended to be sewn to a neckerchief, much like the arrowhead issues from the Lodge. The lodge-approved directions for assembling a neckerchief are shown below:

NC directionssm

In looking at the final line of the directions, it appears that they were printed in August of 1976 (8/76), but the use of the white neckerchief dates back to the arrowhead neckerchiefs of the 1950s.

Here’s the typical result using the directions:

P1 on Silk Neckerchief

P1 on Silk Neckerchief

 In my experience, the pie-shaped issues are most frequently found off of a neckerchief.  This could be due to the effort and skill set required to assemble a neckerchief.  However, there were certainly several kind mothers who did accomplish this feat, resulting in a wide range of materials, ribbon color and texture variation.  Given the variety of materials and construction techniques, the assembled neckerchief can resemble a piece of folk art and is a truly unique addition to a collection.

 Shown below is the 1999 Fall Fellowship patch, which I’ve called P3.  This patch was created to celebrate the 60thAnniversary of Tamegonit Lodge.  At first glance it would appear to be a P issue. In reality it is an event issue, but is included in this book for reference.  To celebrate the lodge’s 60th Anniversary, the author created a neckerchief following the 1974 instructions for the older P1 and P2 patches.

 

60th Anniversary Neckerchief

60th Anniversary Neckerchief

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Beaded Flap

Beaded Order of the Arrow sashes have always been items that generate a great deal of interest, particularly to those interested in the ceremonial aspects of the Order.  I remember seeing the fully beaded sashes with the beaded legend on the back used by the Tamegonit Lodge ceremonial team.  Assuming these are made by hand, it would take a tremendous amount of time and tedious work to construct one of these sashes.  I did a quick search and there are several tutorials on how to construct your own beaded flap if you so choose.

In that same vein, here is a beaded Tamegonit Lodge flap from the early 1980s:

Beaded Flap

Beaded Flap

Made by a lodge member at the time, the flap is similar in size to a typical flap and appears to be modeled after the S11 flap shown below which dates to 1984-85.  The beaded flap has jewel-type beads that give the appearance of a mylar border. 

S11

S11

An interesting item that could be repeated by an industrius Arrowman with plently of time on his hands.

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Here are a couple of interesting neckerchiefs from Kaw Council…the first is a 1968 Troop 45 neckerchief complete with Philmont bull design (thanks to Mike Berenson for letting me scan his neckerchief). 

1968 Troop 45 Philmont Contingent Neckerchief

The second neckerchief (thanks to Jody Tucker) is from what I believe to be a Camp Naish staff contingent to Philmont from 1962.  As shown on the neckerchief, the “TN” brand of Camp Naish is shown next to the “PS” brand from Philmont.  Several years ago I remember a reference to a Camp Staff contingent to Philmont from 1963 or so, but I haven’t been able to track it down.

Camp Naish Staff Philmont Contingent Neckerchief

I am certain there are more contingent neckerchiefs out there from the Kansas City area…if you’ve got one, please send a scan my way and I’ll post it!

AND ONE MORE…

Mike Berenson just sent along the following scan of a 1961 Kaw Council Philmont neckerchief.  The neckerchief is a little faded but the boots have the Philont brands on the soles in yellow ink.  Thanks Mike!

1961 Kaw Council Contingent Neckerchief

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With thanks to Andy Dubill, I am pleased to offer for download a book titled, “The Patches of Camp Theodore Naish”.  The book contains images of many of the patches issued for Camp Naish dating back to the early 1930s.  It was put together in 1996 by several collectors in the Kansas City area.  Since that time, several additional patches have been discovered, many of which are included here at Broad Kaw Valley.  Nonetheless, it is a great resource for Camp Naish collectors/enthusiasts.   If you have any additions for future editions of the book, Andy’s email address is included in the document.

The Patches of Camp Theodore Naish

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The Blue Book – Standard Order of the Arrow Insignia Catalog list one dance team chenille prototype as YC1.  It is noted as having a black background with a white MGM Indian head.  This is not actually a prototype for the C1 dance team chenille produced by the lodge in the late 1980s.  According to Kirk Doan, former lodge adviser, the chenille idea came about around 1983 as the dance team was getting started.  The patches were intended to be sewn to a jacket with the dancer’s name and some indication that they were a member of the Tamegonit Lodge dance team.  In addition to the YC1 shown below, there is also a red version of the chenille from 1983. Each of the patches is approximately 6 inches in diameter. See below:
YC1

YC1

 

YC2?

YC2?

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1990, the year I was inducted into Tamegonit Lodge 147, was also the 75th Annivserary of the Order of the Arrow.  In addition to the flaps for the National Order of the Arrow Conference, Tamegonit Lodge also offered a service flap.  To earn the flap, a lodge member had to complete eight hours of service, fill out a card and have it signed by the lodge chief, camp director, Order of the Arrow coordinator or camp ranger.   Below is a scan of the service flap and a card signed by my dad, Jack Lewis, and Camp Ranger Lloyd Walker.

S22sm 

 

8-hour service_1sm

As previously mentioned, there were also NOAC flaps issued this year with a similar design, but with a grey or silver mylar border (trader/delegate) and the text, “1990 NOAC” in the “Service” text location.  Here’s an example:

S23csm

However, the most intriguing example from 1990 is the red-bordered 1990 NOAC flap:

90NOACsm2

 When the 1990 8-hour service flaps were delivered, two flaps at approximately the middle of each pouch stated “1990 NOAC” rather than “Service”.  I was working in the trading post during Spring Conclave and watched as then-Lodge Chief Tom Sullivan destroyed some of the flaps with a Buck knife.  To my knowledge, at least one escaped the knife and is in a collection.  Are there more of these out there?

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