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Posts Tagged ‘Neckerchief’

I received the following image from a man who attended the 1950 National Jamboree as a member of the Kaw Council contingent.   It is a neckerchief on red cloth with hand-painted covered wagon, sunflower, and wheat – the design uses negative space to reveal “KAW”.  He thought he had some council trading items and pictures – but hasn’t been able to find them yet…

1950 National Jamboree Kaw Council Neckerchief

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In a rare double post, here are some more Brownsea items, this time from the late 1980s.   Included is another neckerchief, patrol ribbon identification, and a Brownsea Troop photo.  Coincidentally, I recognize a few faces in the crowd.  Do you?

Brownsea Participant Neckerchief, BRIGHT orange

Patrol Identification Ribbons, one with a Heart of America Council Brownsea Pin

Brownsea Troop 22 - mid to late 1980s

Thanks to Matt P. for sharing the images.

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I recently felt the urge to find my Eagle Scout neckerchief…and when I did I also found my dad’s and my brother’s.  There are all sorts of Eagle Scout neckerchiefs out there ranging from BSA National-issue to homemade.  The three neckerchiefs shown below are in between — modifications of standard Troop neckerchiefs.  In each case ribbon has been added to the edge of the neckerchief to add a red, white and blue/Eagle Scout effect.  On the latter two, the words “Eagle Scout” and the year the award was earned is embroidered above the troop logo.  I like the understated look of the neckerchiefs.   In chronological order:

Jack Lewis, 1962, Troop 299, Asbury Methodist Church, Prairie Village Kansas

Eric Lewis, 1988, Troop 86, First United Methodist Church, Olathe, Kansas

Kory Lewis, 1992, Troop 86,First United Methodist Church, Olathe, Kansas

What does your troop use to honor Eagle Scouts?   If you have an Eagle Scout neckerchief from the Kansas City area that you would like to share, send me a picture and any pertinent information (year earned, troop location, Scout’s name) and I’ll post it.

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Here’s an interesting flea market find:  a 1941 Boy Scout Round Up neckerchief from Kansas City.  According to “Trail to Eagle:  Six Decades of Scouting in Kansas City 1910-1970,”  Kansas City began hosting annual Boy Scout Round Ups in 1912.  The book states that it was an indoor event intended to showcase Boy Scout skills (pioneering, first aid, firebuilding, etc.) and that the Kansas City event was the first of its kind held indoors. 

The neckerchief is a standard-issue Boy Scout neckerchief with a stencil/block print on top.  It could have been made on site and available to the boys or possibly made by a troop to wear during the event.  I’ve never seen an item similar to this but would enjoy seeing a picture of yours if you have one.

1941 Kansas City Boy Scout Round Up

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Collectors of Tamegonit Lodge know that the first patch issued was the A1 arrowhead neckerchief patch. It is the largest arrowhead from 147, measuring 110 mm tall. A majority of the arrowhead patches I have seen have blue detailing in the totem pole and in the split shingle sign at the base of the pole (the Tennessee-shaped part). Here is an example from my collection, it is an A1b (the ‘b’ variety has pale blue details):

A1b - the 'b' variety has pale blue details

Over the years at least three versions of the A1 have surfaced with white details in place of blue. Here are the examples:

white-a1ssm5

Some might speculate that the blue threads have faded over time to turn white. I have looked closely at two of them and there did not appear to be any residual blue in the threads. Another counter argument to the faded theory is this: wouldn’t the other colors in the patch (red and brown) be faded as well?

  • Does anyone have one of these in their collection?
  • Was the patch factory out of blue thread that day?
  • What should this be called? A1d?
  • Any other theories on why the threads are white?
  • UPDATE:  Another instance of the white thread A1 has surfaced in a recent eBay auction.

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    As summer winds down, here’s an interesting grouping of troop-issued summer camp neckerchiefs for Naish and Bartle. These are from Troop 86 in Olathe, Kansas. I am not sure how many different neckerchiefs were made by Troop 86, but they’ve been camping at Naish and Bartle for quite a while, so I gather there are many more out there stowed away in boxes and drawers. Here’s a sampling (Thanks to Matt Perryn for the first two images):

    1983 - Camp Sawmill - Bartle Scout Reservation

    Camp Bartle - Undated

    1987 - Camp Naish

    Camp Naish - 1990

    Camp Naish - Undated (I got this when I went to Naish in 1989)

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    This week we have five jamboree contingent items from the 1964 National Jamboree, which was held at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The first four are contingent neckerchiefs from the Kansas City Area Council. I assume the different colors were used by different troops from KCAC.

    Thanks to Ryan Meador for the last three scans!

    This same general design was used for the 1969 Jamboree as well. See my earlier post about contingent items from that Jamboree.

    The last item is a small folding comb from KCAC. Jamborees seem to yield a great deal of odd and unique items. At one time I had a small woven sack of wheat from Quvira Council in Wichita, Kansas. I am sure there are a host of other oddities with which this comb could be included.

    I can imagine all of the Jamboree participants lining up to get their council-issued combs before departing for Valley Forge. Look sharp, boys!

    Does anyone have additional 1964 National Jamboree KCAC contingent items?

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